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London Neighborhoods

Aerial photo of the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in London The Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in London

Hackney is one of the most exciting areas in London. The borough has an absolutely thriving art scene, many beautiful parks, and if you’re looking for some of the best cafes, pubs and clubs in the city, you’ve definitely come to the right place! Hackney is one of the largest Inner London boroughs and can be found just to the northeast from the City. The area comprises many famous neighborhoods and areas of London, such as Shoreditch, Hoxton and parts of the Regent’s Canal. It also borders the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, which was the site of the 2012 Summer Olympics. The area flawlessly combines the old with the new, and will definitely take you by surprise!

Welcome to Hackney

Hackney is roughly bordered by City Road and the City in the south, Southgate Road and Islington to the west, Amhurst Park and Harringay to the north, and the River Lea and Stratford to the east. It’s serviced solely by the London Underground along its southern and northern borders, but is easily reachable with the London Overground, which has several stops in the borough. The southern neighborhoods of Hackney are internationally renowned for their nightlife and many galleries and creative shops. Meanwhile, the center and north of the borough are up-and-coming areas that provide attractive options for affordable accommodation within an urban environment. The many fantastic markets, restaurants and pubs in the area also attract their share of celebrities! For example, Russell Brand is often spotted in Hoxton cafes such as Love Shake. In this article we’ll tour some of the top spots in the neighborhood, and show you what it’s like to live in Hackney like a local! Read the entire story here…»

 

Explore London’s Notting Hill Discover Notting Hill in London

Colorful houses, a strikingly blue door, a bustling snow-topped antique market: these images will forever be linked to London’s neighborhood Notting Hill because of the famous 1999 movie bearing the same name. Surprisingly, the neighborhood isn’t so different from the picture painted in Notting Hill. Well-known for its Saturday market among both visitors and Londoners, the largely residential neighborhood boasts beautiful secluded gardens and impressive Victorian townhouses. It’s one of the most sought after areas to live in London, and a wonderful neighborhood to stay in during a visit to the city!

Welcome to Notting Hill

Notting Hill is located to the northwest of Kensington Gardens. It’s roughly bordered by Westway to the north, Inverness Terrace to the east, Notting Hill Gate to the south, and West Cross Route to the west. Ladbroke Grove, Kensington Park Road, Westbourne Grove, and, of course, Portobello Road, are all central streets in the neighborhood. The area is serviced by several London Underground lines, and Notting Hill Gate, Holland Park and Bayswater are its most important stations. While the neighborhood wasn’t fashionable until the 1980s, it’s now an affluent area with many great shops and restaurants. It’s still best known for two things: the annual Notting Hill Carnival and the weekly Portobello Road Market.

In this article, we’ll show you the best spots of the neighborhood, and give you a peek into what it’s like to live like a local in Notting Hill! Read the entire story here…»

 

Picture of Westminster’s Big Ben & Houses of Parliament in London The Houses of Parliament and Big Ben in Westminster, London

When visiting London, you’ll be hard-pressed to find a neighborhood with more beautiful landmarks than Westminster. From the Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament to Westminster Abbey and Buckingham Palace, Westminster is the beating heart of the politics and royal life in London. On your visit to the city, you’ll get to feel like a king or queen when you choose to stay in this gorgeous neighborhood!

Westminster is one of the most central neighborhoods in London. It’s roughly bordered by Mayfair and the bustling Trafalgar Square to the north, Knightsbridge and Sloane Street to the west, and the River Thames to the south and east. The neighborhood is part of the London borough City of Westminster, and not only houses some of London’s most famous landmarks, but also two beautiful parks. There are several subway stations in the neighborhood, making it really easy to travel around town. From the Changing of the Guard at Buckingham Palace to the busy government workers around Parliament Square, you’ll feel completely immersed in London life by staying in this area. Welcome to Westminster! Read the entire story here…»

 

London’s colorful Camden Markets The colorful Camden Markets in the Borough of Camden, London

London has a wide array of fantastic neighborhoods to stay in during a holiday or longer visit to the capital of England. In this article, we’ll highlight an area that’s often overlooked when searching for the perfect accommodation in London: the Borough of Camden. Located just north of the City of London, a bohemian Camden is more affordable than the inner city neighborhoods, while still very central and nearby many London landmarks. The alternative vibe and vibrant culture of Camden make it a great place to stay for both holiday-goers and travelers looking for long-term accommodation.

Welcome to Camden

The London Borough of Camden is located in the northern part of the city, and neighbors the City of London to the south, the City of Westminster and Brent to the west, Barnet and Haringey to the north, and Islington to the east. Camden Town, or Camden, is the central neighborhood of the Borough of Camden. Camden Town is well known for its famous Camden Markets, and also for its many pubs and live music venues. The community offers a very diverse culture, which expresses itself in colorful restaurants serving food from all over the world, unique shops you won’t find anywhere else in London, and a music scene featuring just about any style you can think of. Welcome to Camden! Read the entire story here…»

 

Picture of the north entrance of London’s Westminster Abbey The northern entrance of Westminster Abbey in London

One of London’s most famous landmarks, the Westminster Abbey is a must-see when you visit the capital city of England! Throughout the years, the 700-year-old church has held burials of many historical figures, as well as royal coronations and even weddings. Most recently, it was the site of Prince William and Kate Middleton’s royal wedding on 19 April 2011! Read the entire story here…»

 

British Museum Bloomsbury British Museum Bloomsbury

The picturesque neighborhood of Bloomsbury is often associated with learning, literature, and the arts – and for good reason. The neighborhood is home to many London attractions: the world class British Museum, University of London and it was the home of many famous writers in the early 20th Century such as Virginia Woolf.

The area is best-known among visitors for housing the British Museum, which is a site not to be missed. Founded in 1753, it is the oldest public museum in the world. It famously (and controversially) holds the Elgin Marbles, the sculptures taken from the Parthenon in Athens. It also contains countless artifacts from almost any period in the history of human life on earth, from the Rosetta Stone to giant Egyptian sculptures and other priceless pieces of history. Read the entire story here…»

 

Just south of the Thames is one of the oldest and most interesting parts of London. Over the years, Southwark has been everything from a Roman settlement to the home of Shakespeare. In recent times when it is the center of rebirth along the water in London.

The Shard and the Southwark market The Shard and the Southwark market

Southwark first became important as the ending point of the Roman London Bridge, constructed around 50 A.D. The area was abandoned when the Romans left in the 5th century and reoccupied around 886. During the middle ages it was home to monasteries with Southwark Cathedral being the oldest remaining place of worship from this time. Read the entire story here…»

 

The East End of London The East End of London

While most visitors to London spend the majority of their time in West London, East London is about to be put in the spotlight with the Olympics coming this summer. But East London is more than just the Olympics. It has a fascinating history and if full of a wide range of experiences.

East London historically has been home to the working class immigrants starting around the 19th century working in the factories and docks in the area. During World War II, it was devastated by the Blitz, with the area targeted for the docklands and railways. This is also home to the Cockney rhyming speak. But in the last few decades, the area has undergone a dramatic change, starting with Canary Warf and the O2 Arena and now continuing with the Olympics. Read the entire story here…»

 

London Olympic Stadium under construction London Olympic Stadium under construction

The excitement for next year’s summer Olympics is in full swing in London, even though many of the venues are still being finished.

The Olympic Park is in the East End of London in Stratford where most of the venues will be held. As mentioned, many aren’t completed yet and you can’t access the on foot. But there are several ways to see the stadiums being built.

The only way to get inside the Olympic Park is to take a free tour on a bus. This takes you for a guided sneak peek at the Olympic site as construction carries on. The tour lasts an hour, but there’s no opportunity to get off the bus, but it moves slowly to allow for plenty of photo opportunities. Reservations are required and can be arranged for through the London Olympic 2012 site.

If you can’t snag a reservation for the bus tour, seeing work progress on the site is still possible. The View Tube has been much more popular than expected. Built from recycled shipping containers, the View Tube gives great views from above the Olympic Park with detailed maps and information about the site. It’s open every day from 9 a.m. until 7 p.m. Read the entire story here…»

 

For the last 406 years Londoners have held one of the biggest celebrations of the year on November 5.

Known as Guy Fawkes Day or Bonfire Night, the holiday celebrates the survival of the king and Parliament from an assassination attempt.

Fireworks in London on Guy Fawkes Day Fireworks in London on Guy Fawkes Day

In 1605 Guy Fawkes and a group of five main conspirators attempted to blow up the House of Lords with gunpowder on State Opening Day, the opening of Parliament, when the king and the entire government would be in the House of Lords chamber. This would become known as the Gunpowder Plot. As Catholics, they were persecuted and hoped to install the King’s daughter as a Catholic ruler.

Supposedly a letter was sent to Lord Monteagle warn the fellow Catholic not to be in attendance the next day. A search was made of the storage cellars below the House of Lords and the 36 barrels of gunpowder, along with Fawkes who was keeping watch of it, were discovered. Every year now in Westminster the Houses of Parliament are ceremonially searched. Read the entire story here…»