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Saint Germain – Luxembourg – Saint Michel

Panorama of the 6th Arrondissement in Paris View of the 6th Arrondissement in Paris

Most visitors in Paris want to experience a bit of everything while staying in the City of Lights: a taste of the bohemian lifestyle, the best Parisian cafes, art galleries, museums, parks and more. Lucky for them, it just so happens that the 6th Arrondissement in Paris offers all of these things! It’s the epitome of life in Paris: home to famous cafes such as the Café de Flore and Les Deux Magots, the 6th Arrondissement comprises part of the bustling Latin Quarter. It’s also the intellectual center of the city, with its world famous universities and seat of the Senate in the beautiful Luxembourg Palace, right next to the public park Jardin du Luxembourg. The 6th Arrondissement is one of the most sought after residential neighborhoods in Paris. In this article we’ll show you what living in the 6th Arrondissement looks like!

Welcome to the 6th Arrondissement of Paris

The 6th Arrondissement of Paris includes some of the most famous areas in the city: The Latin Quarter in the northeastern part of the arrondissement, the Saint-Germain-des-Prés neighborhood in the area around the Abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés, the Odéon area around the Odéon Theatre, the Notre-Dame-des-Champs area around the metro station of the same name, and the Luxembourg area around the Jardin du Luxembourg. Discover what it’s like to walk the streets of the 6th Arrondissement in our Latin Quarter video tour. The 6th Arrondissement is roughly bordered by the River Seine in the north, the Boulevard Saint-Michel in the east, the Boulevard du Montparnasse in the south, and the Rue de Sèvres and Rue des Saint Pères in the west. The neighborhood is easily accessible with the metro, as the 4, 10, 12 and RER B lines run right through it. Read the entire story here…»

 

Today we are going to wrap up our video tour of the beautiful Paris neighborhood known as Saint—Germain-des-Prés. This is the third episode of our 3-part series on Saint-Germain-des-Prés, so be sure to check out the 1st Part of our Saint Germain des Prés Tour and Part 2 of the Saint Germain video tour if you haven’t yet watched them. You can find them on the New York Habitat YouTube channel of the New York Habitat Blog.

Video Tour: Saint-Germain-des-Prés – Part 3(5:54)

Once a large monastery and a tiny market town, the French name of this city means “St Germain in the meadows”. This is a fitting name for this area outside of the city walls, just south of the Seine and west of the Latin Quarter. The monastery was founded in 532 A. D. by Childebert, the second king of France. Over time, it gained power, but did not survive the Viking raids of the 9th century. The monks then camped in the ruins until 990 until the time when the monastery was eventually rebuilt by King Robert the Pious. Read the entire story here…»

 

This is the second part of a three part video series dedicated to the Paris neighborhood of Saint-Germain-des-Prés. If you haven’t yet watched the first episode, you can check it out at Saint-Germain-des-Prés video tour article 1. You can also watch Part 3 of our Video Tour of Saint-Germain-des-Prés here.

Video Tour of Saint Germain des Pres, Paris, France – Part 2(5:18)

Saint-Germain-des-Prés is the area just south of the Seine and west of the Latin Quarter. Prior to its current state, this area was once a large monastery and a tiny market town.

The name Saint-Germain-des-Prés translates into  “Saint Germain in the meadows” in English, helping to explain the neighborhood’s location just outside the walls of the city. Read the entire story here…»

 

Hello, I’m David Hill with New York Habitat. Today we’re going to visit another lively part of Paris in this video tour: Saint-Germain-des-Prés!

This will be the 1st episode of a three-part series dedicated to Saint-Germain-des-Prés. You can watch Part 2 of our Video Tour of Saint-Germain-des-Prés here and Part 3 of our Video Tour of Saint-Germain-des-Prés here.


Paris Video Tour of Saint-Germain-des-Prés – Part 1 (6:17)

The Saint-Germain-des-Prés area stretches just south of the Seine and west of the Latin Quarter, and was once a large monastery and a tiny market town. Its name in French means “Saint Germain in the meadows”, and that was exactly where it was located: outside the walls of the city.

The monastery was founded in 532 by Childebert, the second king of France. It became rich and powerful, but did not survive the Viking raids of the 9th century. The monks then camped in the ruins until 990, when the monastery was rebuilt by King Robert the Pious. Read the entire story here…»

 

Saint Germanin des Pres, Paris, France photo Saint Germanin des Pres, Paris, France photo

Paris’ Right Bank cafés deserve their place in literary history. Nevertheless, the history behind Harry’s, Café de la Paix and the Ritz pales in comparison to the formidable literary pedigree of their Left Bank counterparts. The cafes of the Left Bank were immortalized in Ernest Hemingway’s classic works The Sun Also Rises and A Moveable Feast. In the books, and in reality for that matter, the cafes of Montparnasse and St. Germain des Pres were packed with intellectuals drinking, socializing and writing. We at New York Habitat are a nostalgic bunch and we can’t resist the charms of the Left Bank watering holes.

Part two of our literary pub crawl through Paris begins in St. Germain des Prés on the boulevard St. Germain. Three cafés; Les Deux Magots, Café de Flore and the Brasserie Lipp all boast a history of intellectual patrons and belle-epoque charm. The Flore was a second home to Jean Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir and was visited, at varying times, by the likes of Pablo Picasso and Truman Capote. Les Deux Magots affectionately calls itself a “literary café,” thanks in part to its frequent visits from the ubiquitous Papa Hemingway. The Brasserie Lipp beckons to passerbies in this heavily trafficked neighborhood with its mouth-watering neon beer sign. It is said that on the day of Paris’ liberation in 1944 Hemingway was the first in the Lipp’s door for a drink (a claim common among Parisian café lore). All of these eateries are conscience of their history and have raised prices accordingly, while not outrageous do expect to pay a bit extra for the ambiance. Read the entire story here…»