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New York Neighborhoods

Picture of Manhattan’s Upper East Side and Park Avenue. Photo :Asim Bharwani Park Avenue in the Upper East Side of Manhattan. Photo: Asim Bharwani

Of all the beautiful neighborhoods in Manhattan, there are probably none that better captures the spirit of the chic and stylish New York City lifestyle as the Upper East Side. This neighborhood is famous for its classic brownstone buildings, tree-lined streets, world-class museums and restaurants, and of course its affluent inhabitants. Movies such as Breakfast at Tiffany’s and TV series such as Sex and the City have cemented the Upper East Side as an international iconic symbol of luxurious living.

The largely residential neighborhood is one of the most sought after areas to live in New York. In this article we’ll show you what it’s like to stay in the amazing Upper East Side!

Welcome to Manhattan’s Upper East Side

The Upper East Side is a Manhattan neighborhood that’s lodged between Central Park to the west and the East River to the east, 96th Street in the north and 59th Street in the south. Its great popularity has much to do with the ideal location of the neighborhood on the island of Manhattan: it’s right beside the most famous park in New York and close to many of the city’s most beautiful landmarks, including the Midtown Manhattan skyscrapers. The gorgeous houses and apartment buildings of the Upper East Side have been inhabited by the likes of Woody Allen, Michael Bloomberg and Madonna. The neighborhood is simply brimming with celebrated restaurants and high-end stores that all cater to its residents. It’s an ideal neighborhood to stay during a visit to the city, as it’s also well serviced by the metro: the 4,5 & 6 lines run along Lexington Avenue. This makes it easy to commute to school or work, as well as to explore other interesting areas in the city! Read the entire story here…»

 

View of rooftops in Manhattan’s East Village East Village rooftops in Manhattan. Photo by John Weiss.

Mix up trendy cafes with grungy bars, busy New York streets with peaceful community gardens, add a touch of bohemian spirit and you’ll find yourself in Manhattan’s East Village! The East Village is set among many of Manhattan’s most famous neighborhoods, and as such it provides the perfect base to explore Manhattan from. When you decide to stay in the East Village during a visit to Manhattan, you’ll never want for things to see or do: the neighborhood offers some of the best in dining, shopping & nightlife!

Welcome to Manhattan’s East Village

The East Village is set among some of the nicest neighborhoods in Lower Manhattan. It’s bordered by 14th Street and Gramercy to the north, 4th Avenue and Greenwich Village to the west, East Houston Street and the Lower East Side to the south, and the East River to the east. Formerly home to many immigrants, the East Village developed a new identity after the Beatniks moved into the neighborhood in the 1950s. Artists, musicians and hippies followed soon after, and the East Village became the birthplace of artistic movements such as punk rock. Famous bands such as the Ramones performed for the first time at the legendary East Village nightclub CBGB, and artists such as Andy Warhol displayed art installations in the neighborhood. Towards the end of the 20th century the musical Rent portrayed the life of struggling artists in the bohemian East Village. Read the entire story here…»

 

Image of the Upper West Side and Central Park, Manhattan The Upper West Side and Central Park seen from Midtown Manhattan

If your heart is set on staying in Manhattan for an upcoming trip to New York City, consider the vibrant neighborhood of the Upper West Side! The Upper West Side is ideally located within the borough of Manhattan: it borders Central Park and is close to many famous landmarks of the Big Apple. The upscale Upper West Side is also well known for its great selection of stores, restaurants and, not to forget, apartments! Its lively yet residential environment makes this neighborhood perfect for both short-term and long-term stays in New York City.

Welcome to the Upper West Side

Like its name suggests, the Upper West Side is located in the northwest of Manhattan. It’s bordered by Morningside Heights to the north, Central Park to the east, Hell’s Kitchen to the south and the Hudson River to the west. This means it’s lodged between West 59th Street & West 110th Street, between the river and the park. Because of this, the Upper West Side is a very green neighborhood with many amazing parks and tree-lined streets. The architecture is also quite striking, with beautiful brownstones alternated by great old apartment buildings close to Central Park. Read the entire story here…»

 

Picture of Hamilton Heights houses in Upper Manhattan A typical row of houses in Hamilton Heights, Upper Manhattan

Is your heart set on staying in Manhattan during an upcoming visit to New York City? Upper Manhattan is a fantastic and affordable area to consider where you can stay for holidays, studies or work! Most neighborhoods in Upper Manhattan are largely residential, allowing you an extensive selection of homes to choose from.

Exactly what constitutes as Upper Manhattan is often disputed, but generally speaking its borders are 110th Street (or the northern border of Central Park) to the south, the Hudson River to the west, Inwood Hill Park at the northern tip of Manhattan to the north, and the Harlem River to the east. This area is easily accessed by the subway, as there are 4 different subway lines that pass through Upper Manhattan (The 1, the A/B/C/D, the 2/3, and the 4/5/6 lines). Because of this, Upper Manhattan offers easy access to Lower and Midtown Manhattan.

In this article we’ll highlight three popular neighborhoods in Upper Manhattan: Morningside Heights, Hamilton Heights and Washington Heights. We chose these three neighborhoods because they’re not as well known among tourists as some other uptown neighborhoods such as Harlem, but offer fantastic and affordable accommodation options. Furthermore, these Upper Manhattan neighborhoods are family-friendly, and have plenty to offer when it comes to shopping, restaurants, nightlife and culture. Read the entire story here…»

 

A view of Chelsea in Manhattan Chelsea in Midtown Manhattan

Manhattan has many fantastic neighborhoods to stay during holidays (or long visits!) in New York City. One of the most central, beautiful, artsy and exciting of these neighborhoods is Chelsea. Its central location and close proximity to many of New York’s best landmarks makes Chelsea an ideal destination for a holiday to New York! Chelsea is also a largely residential neighborhood, making it a great option for travelers seeking long-term rentals. Read the entire story here…»

 

Picture of the Hell’s Kitchen skyline with skyscrapers Hell’s Kitchen’s skyline and its Midtown West skyscrapers

When you’re planning a trip to New York City, chances are you’ll want to stay in Manhattan. In Manhattan you will find many of New York’s famous attractions and landmarks such as the Empire State Building, Times Square and Central Park. Manhattan is also home to various Universities and is the financial center of the city. So if you’re coming to New York to study, do an internship, or work; Manhattan is the place to be.

However, it can sometimes be difficult too find affordable accommodation in a residential neighborhood in Manhattan. But there are some neighborhoods that are an exception and which manage to combine all the best of Manhattan: great apartments, fantastic restaurants and a thriving cultural life. Hell’s Kitchen in Midtown Manhattan is such a neighborhood. In this article, we’ll introduce you to Hell’s Kitchen and paint you a picture of what it is like to live in this great neighborhood of the best city in the world! Read the entire story here…»

 

Picture of Times Square at dusk in New York City New York City’s Times Square at dusk

Times Square in New York City is perhaps the most famous square in the whole world. It’s certainly been estimated Times Square is the world’s most visited tourist attraction. When you visit Times Square in Midtown Manhattan it’s easy to see why: tourists from all over the globe come to marvel at the neon billboards, see a famous musical, go shopping in the area and soak up the unique Times Square vibe.

In this article, we’ll tell you a little bit about the history of Times Square, and give you tips on what to see and do to make the most of your trip to the iconic New York City square! Read the entire story here…»

 

A picture of a crowd outside New York City’s Apollo Theater in Harlem Harlem’s iconic Apollo Theater in New York City

Harlem is one of New York City’s most diverse and vibrant neighborhoods. It has also played an extremely important part in the history of the city and the nation. During the Civil Rights Movement, Harlem hosted speakers such as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X, who actually lived in Harlem for some time. The neighborhood also became known for its unique culture and art. Nowadays, Harlem’s gospel choirs, Jazz music and soul food have become famous throughout the world, as has the iconic Apollo Theater.

Panoramic image of the Harlem River, Harlem, Central Park and Midtown Manhattan, New York City Panorama of the Harlem River, Harlem, Central Park and Midtown Manhattan in the background, seen from the Bronx in New York City

To find out more about the neighborhood, check out our video tour of Central and West Harlem. Every year, the neighborhood’s diversity, culture and art is celebrated during Harlem Week: a unique tribute that organizes many events during the summer.

What started in the ‘70’s as just one day of celebrating Harlem has turned into an event that stretches across several weeks. In fact, this year Harlem Week events will begin July 28th 2012 and last until August 25th, for what will be the 38th year of Harlem Week.  During this period, the neighborhood’s rich African American, Hispanic, Caribbean and European history will be celebrated with events including concerts, performances, exhibitions, sports events, family programs and, of course, Jazz.

You can check out the full program at the official Harlem Week website, and we will highlight some of the summer’s main events here. Read the entire story here…»

 

Construction of One World Trade Center and the 9/11 Memorial (photo courtesy of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey) A view of the construction site of the World Trade Center (courtesy of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey)

Almost eleven years after the September 11 attacks shook the world, the new World Trade Center is well underway. The National 9/11 Memorial is now open to visitors, and the construction of the new towers is taking shape. In fact, on April 30th, One World Trade Center overcame the Empire State Building as the tallest building in New York City!

Map of the World Trade Center area and its attractions World Trade Center map and its surrounding attractions

It seems Lower Manhattan has finally embraced its new position of being a commemorative site, cultural center, business hotspot, retail destination and residential community. It’s clear this area is definitely a must-see in New York! But where to begin?

1. Visit the National 9/11 Memorial

We suggest you start by visiting the WTC site. In 2003, a master plan was approved which incorporated both the desire to turn the site into a lasting memorial and the will to rebuild the towers even stronger and taller than they stood before. The new WTC will consist of five towers and a new transportation hub surrounding the National 9/11 Memorial [see pin 1 on the map] . The Memorial features two massive square pools that are set within the footprints of the Twin Towers, and bear the names of the nearly 3,000 people killed in the 9/11 attacks and the 1993 bombing of the North Tower. A Memorial Museum stands in between the two fountains, but as of May 2012 it is not yet finished. The plaza surrounding the fountains and museum is filled with hundreds of oak trees. One tree, however, is different: a single pear tree stands out from the rest. This Survivor Tree was saved from the original WTC site after the attacks and nursed back to health. Now it stands proudly at the plaza once more, and has even bloomed again. Visitors gather here just to touch the bark of the “miracle tree”, which has inspired hope and stands as a vision of rebirth. Read the entire story here…»

 

Have you ever wondered what it would be like if several of New York City’s best museums decided to get together and throw one big open house? Well, wonder no longer, because it turns out once a year, some of the city’s greatest cultural institutions do just that.

Held every spring, and now in its 26th year, the Museum Mile Festival is an annual bash in which the stretch of Fifth Avenue between 82nd and 110th Streets is closed to traffic and becomes one big block party. Ten museums lining the Avenue offer free admission, and a variety of fun, interactive educational activities – like chalk drawing, face painting, and a live model drawing class – take place out on the street. Live entertainment options also include bands, clowns, and jugglers, so ideally there’s something for every age group to enjoy.

The MET on Museum Mile at Night The MET on Museum Mile at Night

Some of the best-known museums in New York City participate in Museum Mile, including El Museo del Barrio, the Jewish Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of the City of New York, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and the Neue Galerie. First-time visitors should be aware that the Met and the Guggenheim tend to be the most crowded, so it’s a great opportunity to investigate one of the other museums that you might not know as well. (After all, it’s free!) Read the entire story here…»